Recommendations

At the core of the Alliance Commission on National Energy Efficiency Policy’s work is a comprehensive set of recommendations that have the potential to double U.S. energy productivity by 2030. Benefits to the nation from achieving this goal would be monumental. According to economic impact modeling, the net benefits could be over $1,000 a year in average household savings in utility and transportation costs, over a million added jobs, a one-third reduction in carbon dioxide emissions, and a similar reduction in oil imports.

The Commission urges policy makers and the private sector to take immediate and concerted action—based on the recommendations below—to grow our economy and create jobs while using less energy and reducing costs, security impacts and environmental harm. We recommend three overarching strategies to meet the Energy 2030 goal:

Unleash Investment in energy productivity throughout the economy,

Modernize Regulations and Infrastructure to improve energy productivity, and

Educate and Engage consumers, workers, business executives, and government leaders on ways to drive energy productivity gains.

Because energy productivity gains are cost-effective, we believe these strategies can be implemented without burdensome mandates or massive government spending. To achieve this goal and its benefits, public-private partnerships and targeted government investments will be needed, and some rules will need to be reformed and strengthened. The detailed set of policy recommendations for federal, state, and local governments, as well as the private sector are available in a 16-page summary or full 40-page report.

As part of the Energy 2030 initiative, the Alliance to Save Energy also plans to launch Energy 2030 on the Road, an education, outreach, and action campaign aimed at getting communities and states across the nation to adopt the Energy 2030 goal of doubling energy productivity by 2030. The Energy 2030 on the Road report details the Energy 2030 recommendations geared towards state and local governments and outlines the components of the state and local campaign, which is slated to officially launch in early 2014.