The United States has made great strides since the 1970s to address its energy consumption through the adoption of strong energy efficiency policies. The building sector, comprised of both residential and commercial buildings, currently represents more than 40 percent of national energy consumption, 54 percent of natural gas consumption and more than 70 percent of national electricity consumption. Combined with the fact that the average building will stand for more than 70 years, the building sector should be a major target for widespread energy efficiency efforts

Buildings – including offices, homes, and stores – use 40% of our energy.

Energy Use in Buildings

Buildings – including offices, homes, and stores – use 40% of our energy and 70% of our electricity. Buildings also emit over one-third of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions, which is more than any other sector of the economy. Most buildings waste energy needlessly, making power plants work harder and putting stress on the electric grid, making energy efficiency in buildings incredibly important.

Benefits of Energy-Efficient Buildings

Energy-efficient buildings lessen demand on the electric grid, decrease stress on natural gas supplies, improve local air quality, and save money on utility bills.

Alliance Efforts to Save Energy in the Buildings Sector

Through the Energy Efficient Codes Coalition (EECN), Building & Envelope Technologies Subcommittee, and together with other partners, including the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP), the Alliance promotes the adoption, implementation, and advancement of building energy codes in the United States and abroad; influences national public policy and public opinion on energy-efficient codes; works to increase the availability and affordability of energy-efficient products for government purchasers and procurement officers, helps develop new markets for emerging technologies, and educates consumers about the needs for and benefits of energy efficiency in buildings.

PRIORITIES

The Alliance works to improve the energy efficiency of buildings through several programs that focus on building energy codes, federal energy management, appliance standards, emerging technologies in the buildings sector and educating consumers.

Building Energy Codes

National and state building energy codes overcome market barriers that hamper investment in building energy efficiency. These codes require new and significantly renovated buildings to achieve specific energy targets in the building envelope and major equipment.


The Energy Efficient Codes Coalition (EECC) is a broad-based national advocacy coalition working to improve the energy codes that govern the efficiency of America's new and renovated homes and commercial buildings.

 

Building Envelope Technologies

In 2015 the Alliance charted a Building Envelope Technologies Subcommittee of our Policy & Programs Committee to promote legislation and regulation that advance the development, adoption, and integration of building technologies that improve the energy efficiency of the building envelope (residential, commercial, or industrial).

Energy Efficiency in Government Buildings

Because the federal government is the nation’s largest buyer and No. 1 energy user, the Alliance focuses on federal energy management, and works to increase the availability and affordability of energy-efficient products for government purchasers and procurement officers.